Detectorist

Recovered Foreign Coins from the 1700s and 1800s

Below are actual photos of some of the foreign coins I have recovered from old farm fields and 1700s/1800s home sites in New Jersey. I have included detailed sample photos for reference if my recovered coin was in rough shape. All of these are "natural" finds. I have never participated in a seeded hunt.

FRANCE - 1722 Nine Deniers.

A colonial issue that the Company of the Indies, a private French trading company, imported into New France under the authorization of King Louis XV. The colonists, however, were reluctant to use the new coinage because of their previous experience with depreciation of copper coin. In 1724, all French copper coins were reduced in value by a third of their intrinsic worth and the colonists rejected them totally. Two years later, the unissued copper pieces that remained at Quebec were returned to France.

New France recieved 534,000 pieces, but only 8,180 were successfully put into circulation.

Beginning in 1816, Joseph Bonaparte, once King of Spain and Naples and brother of Napoleon, moved to a large estate in Bordentown, New Jersey. A French coin found within two miles of Joseph Bonaparte's estate makes you wonder if this coin was connected to him, his family or his staff.

Identification source: http://www.coinsandcanada.com

Circulation Info: Guide Book Of United States Coins

1722 Nine Deniers 1722 Nine Deniers

IRELAND - 1723 King George I Hibernia Halfpenny.

In 1722 William Wood purchased a patent for striking copper halfpennies and farthings for Ireland. Wood was a mine owner and entrepreneur and envisaged making a large profit on the difference between the cost of the metal, patent and workmanship and the face value of the coins. The coins were first issued in 1722 in small numbers and during 1723 they were issued in much larger numbers. The coins were considered sub-standard by the population of Ireland (mainly Dublin) and the king was petitioned to revoke the patent. The patent was surrendered by Wood in 1724 in exchange for a pension from the Irish Government. As Wood's coinage was unpopular in Ireland much of the issue was shipped to the American colonies where numismatists include it in their 'colonial series'.

Identification source: www.irishcoinage.com

1723 King George I Hibernia 1723 King George I Hibernia

UNITED KINGDOM - 1717-1724 King George I Halfpenny

Soon after the accession of King George I (1714–1727) the surplus of copper coins was used up, and in 1717 a new contract was signed and a Royal Warrant issued for the production of a new halfpenny.

Identification source: wikipedia

1717-1724 King George I 1717-1724 King George I

IRELAND - 1760 King George II Hibernia Halfpenny with a counterstamp "E Gibbs".

My research shows there was a Sir Edward Gibbs KCB (1777 to 1847) who was a Lieutenant General in the British Army and who became Lieutenant Governor of Jersey (UK).

In 1736 George II introduced a new coinage in copper for Ireland. It was to consist of halfpennies and farthings though the farthing didn't appear until 1737. The coins for this issue were made in London in the Royal Mint and were shipped to Ireland to be placed in circulation. These regal coppers were well made and of good weight so they quickly became accepted in place of the copper tokens that had characterised Irish currency after the failure of the 'Wood's' coinage.

Identification source: www.irishcoinage.com

1760 King George II Hibernia 1760 King George II Hibernia

UNITED KINGDOM - 1729-1739 King George II Halfpenny.

King George II's (1727–1760) halfpennies were the most prolific issue yet, but to them must be added a huge range of counterfeits (and pieces similar to counterfeits but with markedly different legends from the real coins, so that the manufacturers could avoid accusations of counterfeiting). Many genuine coins were melted down and underweight fabrications produced from the molten metal. It is difficult for those of us who use a modern regulated currency to appreciate the extent to which counterfeiting had debased the currency – for long periods of time, counterfeits outnumbered genuine coins.

Identification source: wikipedia

1729-1739 King George II Halfpenny 1729-1739 King George II Halfpenny

SPAIN - 1785 2 Reales (milled bust / Lima mint)

Milled Bust Type: The fifth and final type of Spanish colonial silver coin design in the New World. Struck at the Mexico, Lima, Bogotá, Guatemala, Potosi, Santiago, Popayan, and Cuzco mints in the time period of 1771 to 1825 - all with dates.

Identification source: www.newworldtreasures.com

1785 Spanish 2 Reales 1785 Spanish 2 Reales

SPAIN - 1789 1/2 Reales (milled bust / Mexico mint)

Milled Bust Type: The fifth and final type of Spanish colonial silver coin design in the New World. Struck at the Mexico, Lima, Bogotá, Guatemala, Potosi, Santiago, Popayan, and Cuzco mints in the time period of 1771 to 1825 - all with dates.

Identification source: www.newworldtreasures.com

1789 Spanish 1/2 Reales 1789 Spanish 1/2 Reales

UNITED KINGDOM - 1806 King George III Farthing

The 1799 farthing broke new ground in two areas: the reverse was inscribed 1 FARTHING, the first time the name of a denomination had ever appeared on an English or British coin, and it was also the first British coin to have the date on the same side as the monarch's head.

Identification source: wikipedia

1806 King George III 1806 King George III

UNITED KINGDOM - 1806-1807 King George III Halfpenny

In the reign of King George III (1760–1820) the first issue of halfpennies did not come until 10 years after the king's accession, in 1770. Counterfeiting was rampant, and in 1771 the issuance of counterfeit copper coin became a serious crime; this however had little effect and for the next twenty years or so the majority of copper so-called coins in circulation were forgeries. In March 1782 a female counterfeiter was hanged, then fixed to a stake and burned before the debtor's door at Newgate prison in London. The first King George III era British halfpenny was minted in 1770, and the last in 1807.

Identification source: wikipedia

1806 King George III Halfpenny 1806 King George III Halfpenny

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